Latest News

BMA – Empowering patients to help themselves and us

BMA – Empowering patients to help themselves and us

This week – 14 to 20 November – is Self Care Week, which the BMA is very pleased to support.

Self-care is an obvious win-win for patients, GPs and the wider NHS. It empowers patients to take control of their own health and helps them to make informed decisions about which healthcare services they should access and when.

read more
BMA – The damaging double whammy of over-regulation and underfunding

BMA – The damaging double whammy of over-regulation and underfunding

The GMC published its annual report on the state of medical education and practice in the UK last week in which it spoke about a ‘state of unease in the medical profession’, highlighting:

•A growing pressure on doctors
•A ‘dangerous level of alienation’ felt by doctors in training
•The impact struggling healthcare services are having on doctors’ education and training

read more
BMA – How we can increase GP capacity now

BMA – How we can increase GP capacity now

I attended the Conservative Party conference on behalf of the BMA this week. Health secretary Jeremy Hunt announced plans to increase the number of UK medical students by 1,500 a year from 2018, and to introduce four years of mandatory service following graduation for junior doctors

read more
Tools for GPs to stop bureaucratic workload demands

Tools for GPs to stop bureaucratic workload demands

Imagine if in our daily work as GPs:
•We no longer receive letters requesting a GP to re-refer a patient who misses an outpatient appointment, with hospitals instead directly liaising with patients to book another appointment

•Results of investigations requested by hospital clinicians are communicated by the hospital directly to the patient, including telephoning them where necessary. Patients would therefore no longer make appointments with GPs, for example, to find out the result of the scan they had two weeks ago in hospital, nor would we receive letters requesting us to chase up results for patients discharged, or in-between clinic appointments

read more
We need time for quality and safety

We need time for quality and safety

For most GPs, the greatest constraint to properly caring for our patients is the anachronistic 10-minute consultation, which nine in 10 GPs say cannot meet the needs of patients, both for an ageing population with multiple morbity, and also the transfer of care out of hospital.

A typical older patient with four chronic conditions would previously have occupied four outpatient clinics and taken up nearly one and a half hours, yet we are expected to do the impossible in 10 minutes. The intensity is compounded by GPs seeing far too many patients in a day – European averages are a maximum of 25 patients a day, yet in the UK, GPs can have upwards of 60 patient contacts daily. This short-changes patients and undermines quality and safety.

read more

Subscribe

Enter your email address to subscribe to LMC News and receive notifications of new posts by email.