The Future Of General Practice

The Future Of General Practice

I am writing to remind you about our Future of General Practice meetings being held on: – Tuesday 2nd February at Lanhydrock Golf Club and Thursday 4th February at St Michael’s Hotel, Falmouth Both events will start with refreshments from 1830. We aim to start the meeting at 1900 hrs and finish by 2130 at the latest. These meetings are an opportunity for you to provide your personal and practice’s views and influence the Future of General Practice in Cornwall & Isles of Scilly.  The meeting will also help the LMC and the CCG to gather ‘intelligence’ from GPs of all levels of experience including those in training and those approaching the end of their careers to inform the Sustainability and Transformation Plan (required in June 2016) that includes clear plans for the sustainability of general practice. The format will involve an introduction to include: – Current workforce provision Workforce projections Work of the Primary Care 2020 group Five Year Forward View and strategic planning Government intentions Current and possible future contractual framework An LMC view of the direction of travel for Primary Care This part of the evening should take no more than 30-45 minutes because the second part of the evening will be devoted to small group discussions on the above topics and will include discussions on: – Career intentions Shape of Cornish General Practice The future of GP partnership Portfolio Careers Premises Federation Workforce development To book your place please email: christina.moore@kernowlmc.co.uk Your involvement in these meetings is crucial and we hope to see as many of you there as possible. Dr Peter Merrin Chair Cornwall...
NHS Pension Scheme

NHS Pension Scheme

The LMC are holding two evening events. 23rd April at Lanhydrock Golf Club, near Bodmin and 28th April at Penventon Park Hotel, near Redruth on the changes to the NHS pension scheme. Refreshment will be available from 7pm. Can you please let us know if you would like to attend, there is no charge for the events, but we need to have an idea of numbers for catering purposes. The seminars, run by Luke Bennett of Francis Clarke will cover the following issues. • Reminder of differences between 1995, 2008 and 2015 Schemes • Difference between officer and practitioner posts • Pension flexibilities – making sure you are getting the maximum pension • Tax impact if annual allowance exceeded; is Scheme Pays a good idea? • Tax impact if lifetime allowance exceeded; • Interaction with personal pension funds • Protections available for lifetime allowance • How to decide whether to o Carry on contributing o Continue with added years o Become a deferred member o Take 24 hour...
Occupational Health – briefing

Occupational Health – briefing

The last month has seen rapid developments in the challenges facing the Peninsula Occupational Health Service (POHS). A round table meeting took place on Wednesday 25th February at which a way forward was agreed between Devon Doctors On Call (DDOC) and the representatives of SHED and Kernow CIC. The Board of DDOC has sanctioned the use of the POHS surplus to fund the current service beyond 1st April when NHS England funding will largely stop. This means that current arrangements for occupational health will continue unchanged until 31st May. This commitment to stabilising the service allows us the time to structure a new service that will be launched on 1st June. After April, NHS England will fund a vestigial service including: 1) ongoing treatment costs for those already in therapy 2) OH assessments for those practitioners in performance processes 3) a needlestick injury service The remainder of OH provision represents the bulk of our current operation and includes the holistic service based at Tamar Science Park and the professional psychological support unit run by Ben Charnaud, Anne Read and Linda Barry. It has been agreed between all the parties that DDOC will continue to be the provider of the ongoing service which will be offered direct to the profession. DDOC intends to subcontract the two parts of the service to the current providers, so that practices and practitioners who sign up will benefit from a holistic service with full psychological support of a standard at least as high as that already enjoyed. The service to date has cost NHS England less than £500k to provide this exemplar service across...
Tackling the challenges GPs face

Tackling the challenges GPs face

 The unique strength of GPC as your representative body comes from its infrastructure of LMCs — it democratically represents the interests of general practice across the UK. It is vital GPC connects with and understands everyday GPs on the ground, which is why we go out and speak at your local and regional meetings throughout the year. We run a series of national GPC roadshows twice yearly, which are open to all GPs and hosted by LMCs (local medical committees). These have been running this month in more than 10 areas across England. Last week I spoke at Beds and Herts, Kent, and West Midlands LMCs, which gave me an invaluable opportunity to report on the work and priorities of GPC, and most importantly to hear directly from grassroots colleagues about their issues and concerns, coupled with lively debate on how to move forward together to address the challenges ahead. These meetings cover issues including: Forthcoming changes to the GP contract Managing workload Co-commissioning New models of care Workforce GP premises. You may still have time to attend a roadshow in your area.   Workload A constant theme in the roadshows has been our excessive and unmanageable workload. I was pleased that so many practices are finding our guidance on managing workload, Quality First, useful. One GP who has a partnership vacancy, and was fortunate enough to have applicants, told me that as part of the interview process prospective partners were asked to use our guidance to present a practice-workload management strategy. Another GP recounted that in a recent CCG (clinical commissioning group) practice visit, he used our guidance to...
Your Chairman Writes …

Your Chairman Writes …

Medico-politically this should be a quiet time of the year. We are approaching a General Election and although the political parties are setting out their policies ahead of their manifestos, no one wants to upset the NHS applecart especially in the light of the Five Year Forward View. Cornwall, however, is quietly undergoing a small medical revolution. The major news of course is that a GP owned company has won the GP OOH contract. How did we get here ? Let’s recap the events that have brought us to this point. A year ago the LMC led a series of countywide events entitled ‘The Future of General Practice’. The overwhelming majority of attendees expressed support for the development of a Cornwall GP provider company with the intent to protect and develop Cornish General Practice and to bid for the GP OOH service. Very rapidly Kernow Health CIC was born and a further company Cornwall Health has evolved from Kernow Health and Devon Doc. It is this company that will run our OOH service. The work with Devon Doc and the formation of Cornwall Health is the culmination of the decisions taken at those Future of General Practice meetings. I think this fact highlights a number of issues. Firstly, when GPs act together they can effect large and seismic change in the healthcare environment. Secondly the future is in our hands. It is my strong belief that standing still will create a vacuum that others will fill. We must continue to innovate and make bold decisions about our futures. However, this aspect of our future will require continued hard work...
New BMA Guidance

New BMA Guidance

The BMA has produced some new guidelines on delivering safe patentee care (the complete documents can be downloaded from our “Latest Guidance” page. It is in response to GP workload having now reached unmanageable proportions, against a backdrop of escalating demand, which has far outstripped our impoverished capacity, and which is seriously impairing our ability to deliver the care our patients need. GPs are trying to square an impossible circle; many working 12- to 14-hour days, seeing up to 50 patients — including those with complex needs — on a conveyor belt of 10-minute slots, added to by numerous telephone consultations, daily home visits, ploughing through a mountain of hospital correspondence, test results and repeat prescriptions, writing reports, making referrals, attending meetings, as well as the rigours of running a GP practice. No wonder the recent BMA quarterly tracker survey showed that the percentage of GPs describing their workload as ‘unsustainable’ was 74 per cent — higher than for any other category of doctor. Funding cuts to individual practices via imposed changes to the MPIG (minimum income practice guarantee) and PMS (personal medical services) reviews are exacerbating the problem, while other practices are struggling to provide services with unfilled GP vacancies. In this intense, pressured climate, it is crucial that the safe provision of care to patients remains GPs’ overriding priority, at a time when practices are undermined from doing so by excessive, inappropriate or unresourced work. Quality First: Managing Workload to Provide Safe Patient Care is a handbook to empower practices with practical tools, including model templates, to manage workload and to shape demand, in order to fulfil...