BMA – GP Retention Scheme launched: what it means for you

BMA – GP Retention Scheme launched: what it means for you

    Dear , At a time of severe GP shortages, when we know that one in three GPs surveyed intend to retire in the next five years, it is vital that every effort should be made to retain the trained GP workforce. I am therefore pleased that the GP Retention Scheme has now been launched, which GPC has helped negotiate on your behalf through the 2017/18 GMS contract negotiations, as well as it being a commitment in the GP Forward View. You can read our step-by-step guide to accessing the scheme, including who is eligible, funding available, support provided to practices employing a retained doctor, and a set of FAQs. In essence, the GP Retention Scheme (formerly the Retained Doctor Scheme) is a package of support and resources aimed at GPs who may be considering leaving the profession, to remain in clinical practice providing between one and four sessions per week. It includes protected time for continuing professional development with educational support. The scheme supports both the GP who is being retained and the practice employing them by offering financial support in recognition of the fact that this role is different to a ‘regular’ part-time, salaried GP post, offering greater flexibility and support. Retained GPs may be on the scheme for a maximum of five years with an annual review each year to ensure that the GP concerned remains in need of the scheme and that the practice is meeting its obligations. Practices will be resourced to pay the retained GP an annual professional expenses supplement of £1,000 per weekly contracted session to help fund the cost of...
BMA – The 2017/18 GMS Contract is now live

BMA – The 2017/18 GMS Contract is now live

From your BMA GPs committee chair The 2017/18 GMS Contract is now live – make sure you know how the changes affect you Dear colleagues, I am writing to remind you that the revised 2017/18 GMS contract is now live as of April 1st 2017. GPC has worked hard to negotiate with NHS Employers changes we believe offer significant improvements to the contract and will benefit and better support GPs and practice teams. You can read more about the details of the contract in our dedicated contract webpage here, but I have summarised below the main changes, and highlighted the actions which you and your practice may need to take: Discontinuation of Avoiding Unplanned Admissions DES (AUA) The AUA DES has now been discontinued. You no longer need to collect reporting data regarding care plans or submit claim forms. The corresponding £156.7m has been transferred to global sum, and which will be reflected in your monthly G/PMS statements from April onwards. From 1 July 2017 practices will use an appropriate tool to identify patients aged 65 and over who are living with moderate and severe frailty. For those patients identified as living with severe frailty, the practice will deliver a clinical review providing an annual medication review and where clinically appropriate discuss whether the patient has fallen in the last 12 months and provide any other clinically relevant interventions. In addition, where a patient does not already have an enriched Summary Care Record (SCR) the practice will promote this seeking informed patient consent to activate the enriched SCR. Action: Further guidance from GPC and NHS England will be available...
BMA – Changes to IR35 Rule

BMA – Changes to IR35 Rule

    Be prepared for changes to IR35 rules which could affect how locum GPs are paid It is important that all GP practices are aware of changes to IR35 rules that take effect on 6 April. They relate to paying workers who provide services via intermediaries (for example, although not restricted to, workers’ limited companies). What is IR35? IR35 is an anti-tax avoidance measure introduced by the Government in April 2000. It is also known as the ‘intermediaries legislation’. Its purpose is to prevent workers from avoiding paying employee income tax and NICs (national insurance contributions) by supplying their services through an intermediary (usually a ‘personal service company’) and paying themselves dividends rather than as employees. The rules apply across the UK. How does it affect locums and practices? It is important to note that IR35 only applies where locums (or other individuals) are engaged via an intermediary. IR35 does not apply to genuine self-employed locums providing their services directly to practices. The IR35 rules have to date required the intermediary to establish the nature of the relationship between the locum and the practice. Where an employment contract would have existed between the locum and the practice in the absence of the intermediary, the intermediary has had an obligation to pay the locum as if an employee net of tax and NIC. IR35 changes will affect ‘public sector bodies’ – including general medical services and personal medical services practices and NHS trusts – who engage locums to provide services via an intermediary. Non-public sector bodies such as APMS (alternative provider medical services) providers or commercial providers that provide...